the wulf.

02.15.2014 8:00 p.m.

Ulrich Krieger & Josh Carro Present...

Fathom by U.K. (50')
-- intermission -- (20')
Cymbal by U.K. (15')
sketches of L.A. by j.c. (30')

FATHOM

Doom Metal meets Reductionism in the Purgatory of Just Intonation

The Fathom Quartet includes musicians working and collaborating with Lou Reed, Lee Ranaldo (from Sonic Youth), and Merzbow (Ulrich Krieger), Faust (Krieger and Josh Carro) and the Grandmothers of Invention (Max Kutner) among others.

Fathom
for contrabass clarinet, 2 just intonation electric guitars, electronic sounds, and amplified percussion

Ulrich Krieger
(2003)

to fathom
(to measure, to probe, to explore, to examine, to grasp, to conceive)
 
A composition for a rock instrumentation: (contrabass-) clarinet, 2 (just intonation) electric guitars, percussion and fixed media.
Doom metal meets Morton Feldman - like flying through liquid space…
 
Rhythmic-metrical repetitive sounds, melodies, riffs, and patterns, creating poly-metrical structures of overlapping times.
"Summation-Patterns” (∑-Pattern) will emerge from this in the same way as summation tones emerge from overlapping frequencies.
Iridescent patterns originate, weaving a texture with much space (no loops).
Filigree, hypnotic, and sensual the piece bridges the gap between ‘New Music’ and experimental Rock.
 
The listener follows individual parts or the overall texture – or switching between both.
Sometimes the music seems to be static, then small changes surface, until suddenly something new develops from there.
Individual voices emerge from the group, floating on the sound, only to vanish again in the ensemble, like voices in a counterpoint.
 
The relationship between sound and time has been a central theme for my work in the last couple of years. Both elements are for me the main ones, which create a certain directness and sensuality in music. This includes also repetitions (regular or asymmetrical ones), which were so long neglected by European contemporary music. By layering very reduced material, very complex soundscapes can be produced, which I call ‘instrumental or acoustic electronics’: a rhythmical/metrical music, which is static, sound orientated, rhythmical and melodic at the same time,
which leaves space, breathes, accumulates and thins out again.
 
Everything changes – nothing changes.